Race & Racism at the University of Richmond

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This photograph, which accompanied information about various University of Richmond sporting events for the week, is captioned: "Spider Man is latest attraction at UR's home games, courtesy of the art students. Richmond's next home game is a week…

This Collegian article is a theater review of the production Conquest of My Brother presented by the University Players in November 1975. The reviewer Heath Haworth asserts the play is more of a “didactic, preachy documentary” rather than…

This photo from The Web 1985 shows members of Phi Gamma Delta posing in front of the Bill "Bojangles" Robinson statue in the Jackson Ward neighborhood of Richmond, Virginia. Bill Robinson was a famous tap dancer and actor and a native of Richmond. He…

These two pages from The Web 1976 feature photographs from the University Players’ production of the play “Conquest of My Brother” in November 1975. “Conquest of My Brother” is a documentary-style play by Edward F. Emanuel that is about the…

This page from The Web 1976 features photographs from the University Players' production of the play “The Teahouse of the August Moon” in February 1976. “The Teahouse of the August Moon” is an American war comedy written by John Patrick based…

The bottom right photo on the second page of the 1948 Phi Alpha spread features fraternity members in blackface. The fraternities had recently reopened on campus after World War II.

In the middle photo at the bottom of the second page of the Phi Gamma Delta spread, two life-size, extremely caricatured African cut-out figures can be seen outside of a Phi Gamma Delta (or "Fiji") Tent. The caption reads,"Dr. Livingstone, I…

This article seeks to publish factual information about the song "Dixie," particularly as students began to object to its use at university events. This piece discusses the controversy of whether or not “Dixie” or “Dixie’s Land” should be…

The article addresses how many black students at the University of Richmond think that the playing of "Dixie" could harm black student recruitment. Students said that they would not have attended Richmond if they heard the song before committing to…

This letter was sent on November 1, 1971, from Wildman S. Kincheloe to E. Bruce Heilman, the President of the University of Richmond. Kincheloe wrote to Heilman after reading in the Richmond newspapers that the University’s Provost requested that…
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