Race & Racism at the University of Richmond

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In The Collegian article “Lo, The Poor Negro…” published December 10th 1943 expands on a letter to the editor piece published in the Richmond Times-Dispatch which asked, “Is a democracy based upon ideology which is not put…

The president report for the year 1966-1967 shows statistics and enrollment numbers for all of the school apart of University of Richmond. University College had just over 2,000 students and Junior College had 456 students.

This article -- published on September 11, 1980, in The Collegian -- describes the potential addition of University of Richmond's first black fraternity, Phi Beta Sigma. In the article, it mentions Richmond senior, James Reed, who would serve…

This article -- published on October 23, 1980, in The Collegian -- describes the discontent that black students had toward the way students, faculty, and even parents treated them at the University of Richmond. Students who were interviewed described…

The article, "Two Students Discuss The Life Of A One Percent Minority" published by The Collegian on January 18th, 1973, interviews two black students, Stanley Davis and Belinda Carr, on their University of Richmond experience. Stanley Davis was the…

The article "Registrars Seek To Overcome 150 Years Of Black Exclusion" published by The Collegian on January 18th, 1973, describes University of Richmond's administrators' efforts to reconcile 150 year history of excluding black people, to instead…

The article "Blacks Offer Much To Spider Athletics" describes the athletic accomplishments of the black student athletes. The article mentions Weldon Edwards, the first black football player, and Norman Williams and Jerome Napier, who were on the…

James E. Greene was a black 43 year old history major at the University of Richmond. He was married with six children at the time the article was published on January 18th 1973. The article "43 Year Old RC Senior Cites Black Problems" published by…

The article "Black Liberation Means An End To White Power," explores Black Theology and the work of Dr. James H. Cone who believed that Christianity supports oppression and slavery. To him, Christianity was a tool of White Power that needed to be…

The opinion piece "Collegian Forum," argues that the song "Dixie" had not been used as a racist symbol at the University of Richmond and that the black students should not take too much offense towards this song. "The song 'Dixie' should not be…
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