Race & Racism at the University of Richmond

Browse Items (60 total)

In response to an article on Richmond College's revival of the Messenger literary magazine, an editor reflects on the campus's past of "apathy, unconcern, and even ridicule of campus writers," ultimately deciding that the students have changed and…

After the Richmond College senate accepted financial responsibility for the return of the Richmond Messenger, a Collegian reporter interviewed professors and students interested in writing on their feelings for the publication. While many professors…

The writer of this piece argues that the Messenger does not "publish representative literary expression from the two colleges" and "has failed to attract the average local student." They claim that faculty censorship and favoritism in submissions…

The writer of this article claims that the Messenger will soon "belong to the whole University and not exclusively to Westhampton College" due to Richmond College's upcoming financial involvement in the publication. They elaborate that Richmond…

The effort to make the Messenger a joint publication between Richmond and Westhampton Colleges, as it was only published by Westhampton at this time, failed due to difficulties reconciling the colleges' budgets. Messenger editor Sue Cook McClure…

This 1877 essay from Monthly Musings, the predecessor to the Messenger literary magazine, argues against the Theory of Evolution. It begins with the assertion that the belief that men were once "savages" is currently fashionable. The writer looks to…

This 1923 article reports that the recent Westhampton junior/freshman class wedding was carried out "according to Chinese custom." The presidents of both classes were the participants in the ceremony. The ceremony, which included carrying the bride…

This is an advertisement in the Messenger published in 1925 for a record store called "The Perfect Record Store". This ad features a drawing of a black man in a suit and sideways hat, sitting on a stump. The advertisement also appeared in the the…

This poem by a white student describes two "bums," one black and one white, who ultimately realize that, despite their differences and the oppressive attitudes of the white person towards the black person, each is the only friend that the other has.

This poem is a celebration of the narrator's "angel," a black woman with "coca skin" and "dark softness." It was the only poem by a black student in the 1984 Messenger.
Output Formats

atom, dcmes-xml, json, omeka-json, omeka-xml, rss2