Race & Racism at the University of Richmond

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This Collegian writer, who signs as D.F., argues in support of the Messenger in response to the Board of Publications's questioning of the magazine's livelihood. The Board appointed a committee because, according to Board of Publications chairman…

This anti-integration quote from student Olen Lewis claims that, while accepting black and white Americans as "brothers" that "love each other," they should desire to be separate in some instances. This was published four years before the Messenger…

The writer of this piece questions her black identity in the form of asking if she is allowed to say the "n word." While she feels unable to because of her middle/upper class upbringing, she relays anecdotes such as her sister straightening her hair…

The author of this piece reflects on being "more American" than she thought when seeing black men in the news, likely after the killing of an unarmed black man, while she's out of the country. She states that, even though America is her home, it…

The editor of the Messenger, John Davis, lashes out at students Lacy and Atkins for their criticism of the literary magazine's contents. Both men called for the magazine to contain more humor and Davis urges for them to submit some themselves, as the…

In a letter to the editor, Messenger editor Abdullah Mina questions columnist Edie Graves's criticism of the literary magazine as both a "total loss" and "typical," calling Graves a "would-be intellect" and asserting her column was an aggressive…

The author of this letter, who is the feature editor of the Citadel literary magazine, advertises their "Parade of Southern Belles" feature, which he asserts "is not a beauty contest, but more of a parade or exhibit of Southern girls." He then asks…

This illustration of the Philogian Society and Messenger staff of 1960 features a caricature of Lebanese student Abdullah Mina in the upper left corner. Mina is wearing stereotypical Middle Eastern clothing and his nose is exaggerated.

This comedic map of the University of Richmond campus features racist jokes. One can be seen in the captions around the gym, called "Jim," which refer to black athletic trainer Esau Brooks as "the Indian rubber man." Running to the gym is an "Indian…

This cartoon shows a white ventriloquist agreeing to his sentiment of, "We were all mighty happy until we were interfered with... Weren't we?" with a blackface-wearing ventriloquist's dummy. This refers to forced integration that occurred in public…
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