Race & Racism at the University of Richmond

Browse Items (60 total)

This anti-integration quote from student Olen Lewis claims that, while accepting black and white Americans as "brothers" that "love each other," they should desire to be separate in some instances. This was published four years before the Messenger…

This comedic map of the University of Richmond campus features racist jokes. One can be seen in the captions around the gym, called "Jim," which refer to black athletic trainer Esau Brooks as "the Indian rubber man." Running to the gym is an "Indian…

This short story follows an unnamed American narrator and his peers traveling to Africa for writing inspiration. It points out and pokes fun at the tendency of European and American authors to use contrasting epithets to describe the continent, such…

This 1877 essay from Monthly Musings, the predecessor to the Messenger literary magazine, argues against the Theory of Evolution. It begins with the assertion that the belief that men were once "savages" is currently fashionable. The writer looks to…

The 1967 edition of the Messenger's theme was "controversy." Its final piece, "The 20th Century vs. The U of R," argues that the University should have less of an influence on students' morality and not act as their "guardian." The piece's author,…

The author of this letter, who is the feature editor of the Citadel literary magazine, advertises their "Parade of Southern Belles" feature, which he asserts "is not a beauty contest, but more of a parade or exhibit of Southern girls." He then asks…

In this poem, the narrator claims that Jewish people always live in sukkot (plural form of sukkah), defined at the end of the piece as "a small tent built for a week of meals and prayer to celebrate the Jewish harvest holiday of Succoth." It…

This poem from the Spring 1990 issue of the Messenger features an assumedly French female student who corrects a classmate's pronunciation of the word 'femme fatale.' Another classmate then reminds her that they aren't in France. The narrator then…

This poem is narrated by someone who feels left behind by a charismatic politician. References are made to the politician's constituents as being "scraps of self" and asking too much by expecting the politician to make their burdens his or her own,…

This sketch (a brief, abstract descriptive poem) begins with the "fear of a black" that is then related to the prevention of typhoid, which "results in the American Army." The three words of "Negro / Mister / Coffee" follow the words "They mystify."…
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