Race & Racism at the University of Richmond

Browse Items (9 total)

The re-hash is a joke section of the Collegian, including the following: "Aunt Jemima, a big negro washer-woman, had just been knocked down by an automobile. A crowd gathered around to sympathize with her. 'You'll get damages for this, Aunt Jemima,'…

This article was written about English professor Dr. Grace Landrum’s reading of “Marse Chan,” one of the most famous works of Thomas Nelson Page. “Marse Chan” nostalgically represented the “Old South,” and in this article, Dr. Landrum…

In this six-page short story, the author W.H. Brannock offers a story situated in 1870 about a black man named Methuselah Jones. Throughout this story, the author refers to Methuselah Jones as a "typical country darkey" and "the blackest 'nigger' in…

This section "Dips From The College Grin-Pot" features snippets of what was intended to be humorous dialogue. Included are six brief dialogues that feature an interaction between two people. The fifth dialogue is an interaction between two African…

This short story, published in the spring of 1914, provides a description of student life at Richmond College. The college student, John, and his father, explain academics and activities at the university to Uncle Cy, a black farm worker. The author…

This review is in the Exchanges section of the Messenger, which appears monthly. In this month's entry, Wirt Davis reviews a short story titled "The Last Confederate" from the University of Virginia's Magazine. Davis criticizes the author for slip…

This short story mocks African Americans through racist exaggerated vernacular and creating a character, named "A'nt Lucy" that is described as obese, lazy, dirty and "the blackest n*****." The plot of this story is that the there was a leaf found…

On page six, in the "Re-Hash" weekly joke column, there is a joke that uses verbal blackface. It reads, "Liza, I'se gwine to kiss yuh when Ah goes!" [Reply] "Black boy, leave dis hear house at onct!" This use of dialect was presented as a form of…

This six-page short story, written by Frances D. Glassell, explores the lives of former slaves living on the property of their former owner. On the day the story is set one of the former slaves, Uncle Job, was sent to the ferry dock to pick up Aunt…
Output Formats

atom, dcmes-xml, json, omeka-json, omeka-xml, rss2