Race & Racism at the University of Richmond

Browse Items (16 total)

This short story written in the 1911 yearbook titled, "Uncle Remus on Coeds" and goes into detail about the elaborate parties that coeds throw, through the narrative of Uncle Remus. The story uses "negro" dialect and misspellings of words in order to…

This short story written in the 1910 yearbook is titled "Mammy Rose" and centers around a young man Marse Roberts who has lost hope at being successful. However an older "colored" woman comes upon him, and they reconnect as she took care of him when…

The re-hash is a joke section of the Collegian, including the following: "Aunt Jemima, a big negro washer-woman, had just been knocked down by an automobile. A crowd gathered around to sympathize with her. 'You'll get damages for this, Aunt Jemima,'…

An article about housing ordinances at Westhampton College, including that the students would be allowed to keep their lights on until midnight. At the bottom of the article are two "jokes," used often to fill space in the Collegian. The second joke…

In "Hash and Re-hash," a column often printed in The Richmond Collegian, the writers share a series of humorous stories, many based on word play, puns, and one-line jokes, with the target of jokes often being black people. This column is credited to…

This article is about a concert from the Jasper Hall stringed quartet at Atlee High School, an event organized by a University of Richmond alum Joseph Rotella '22 to raise money for the school's library. The program consisted of "stringed and vocal…

This article was written about English professor Dr. Grace Landrum’s reading of “Marse Chan,” one of the most famous works of Thomas Nelson Page. “Marse Chan” nostalgically represented the “Old South,” and in…

In this six-page short story, the author W.H. Brannock offers a story situated in 1870 about a black man named Methuselah Jones. Throughout this story, the author refers to Methuselah Jones as a "typical country darkey" and "the blackest 'nigger' in…

This section "Dips From The College Grin-Pot" features snippets of what was intended to be humorous dialogue. Included are six brief dialogues that feature an interaction between two people. The fifth dialogue is an interaction between two black…

This short story, published in the spring of 1914, provides a description of student life at Richmond College. The college student, John, and his father, explain academics and activities at the university to Uncle Cy, a black farm worker. The author…
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