Race & Racism at the University of Richmond

Browse Items (19 total)

In this fable-style short story, Gellman describes a stereotypical, poor Irish boy named Tobias who steals and cons people out of money to make a living, until one day when he is moved with sympathy for another "poor" boy, Mickey. After Tobias gives…

The Fall 1991 issue of the Messenger prompted University officials to withdraw the magazine from the admissions office and no longer send it to alumni. A memo from Gerald Quigg, vice president of University relations, claimed that crude language used…

This article defines the "literary quality" mentioned in student handbooks given to freshman (called "Rats" by the author). Gibson claims that literary realism is sometimes "vulgar" and "obscene" just to be shocking, which makes it "pornographic…

In this four-page short story, author George W. Sadler offers an account of a missionary trip to Africa. The story makes comparisons between African culture and American culture, claiming "social life in Africa means more than it does here." The…

In this three-page story, the author, A.W., offers a fictional account of the black stereotype of a "mammy" which describes a black woman who works as a housekeeper and/or nanny for white families. The story lovingly describes mammies, but it is a…

In this short story, a law student named Winston Kingstone Manners the Fourth does cocaine and finds a book that contains his life story. Moments in his past are described as, "The beaten black boy, the date-raped freshman, and the threatened…

This short story was written by student Yeu Chor Chan from Hong Kong. This story was his first publication in English. In it, he describes a peaceful scene by a lake (possibly Westhampton Lake, as a "brick bell tower" is to the left of the narrator…

In this short story, an American soldier named Taylor is shot and killed after enduring torture in an unspecified Asian POW camp. Taylor is reincarnated multiple times before the story of his shooting is told, in which a military commander named…

This short story from the February 1941 Messenger details the passing of a black woman named Bess. Bess's dress is described as being scant and attention-grabbing, and an unnamed man urges her to marry someone who is "her own kind" and criticizes her…

This short story is a retelling of the myth of Perseus and Medusa, written in black American dialect by a white student. The young women in the tale are oversexualized and the narrator exhibits colorism by referring to Polydectes's "high yaller"…
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