Race & Racism at the University of Richmond

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This article provides a description of an art show called “Intimate Images” at 1708 E. Main St. Gallery that includes art by artists Judy McLeod, Jude Schlotzhauer, and Amy Archinal. Each artist has a distinct style and focuses on issues such as,…

The Fall 1991 issue of the Messenger prompted University officials to withdraw the magazine from the admissions office and no longer send it to alumni. A memo from Gerald Quigg, vice president of University relations, claimed that crude language used…

This article defines the "literary quality" mentioned in student handbooks given to freshman (called "Rats" by the author). Gibson claims that literary realism is sometimes "vulgar" and "obscene" just to be shocking, which makes it "pornographic…

This sketch (a brief, abstract descriptive poem) begins with the "fear of a black" that is then related to the prevention of typhoid, which "results in the American Army." The three words of "Negro / Mister / Coffee" follow the words "They mystify."…

This poem is narrated by someone who feels left behind by a charismatic politician. References are made to the politician's constituents as being "scraps of self" and asking too much by expecting the politician to make their burdens his or her own,…

This poem from the Spring 1990 issue of the Messenger features an assumedly French female student who corrects a classmate's pronunciation of the word 'femme fatale.' Another classmate then reminds her that they aren't in France. The narrator then…

In this poem, the narrator claims that Jewish people always live in sukkot (plural form of sukkah), defined at the end of the piece as "a small tent built for a week of meals and prayer to celebrate the Jewish harvest holiday of Succoth." It…

The author of this poem claims that she is "an Asian who wants to be white" and begins the poem with the choice, "I want to be more American." When asked what's stopping her, though, she responds, "That's not who I am." The root of her desire to be…

This poem, narrated by "the slave's dream and hope," attacks the idea of "good hair" as a superior, more acceptable alternative to natural black hair. It asserts that good hair should have been left on the plantations, and compares it to the song…

The narrator of this poem expresses his identity as part of a "colossal being" of black people, preferring the collective 'we' to the singular 'I.' He explores slavery as "the torture that was endured for years and still / Silently exists today"…
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