Race & Racism at the University of Richmond

Browse Items (33 total)

A poem, "I Am the Lawyer written by Louis Lande, from New York City. Louis Lande was not a student of Richmond College, but his poem was reprinted from the New York Law Journal, Wednesday, May 28, 1930 and was included in The 1931 Web. Lande was a…

In this article, the author discusses how the fall 1991 issue of the University’s literary magazine, The Messenger, prompted University officials to consider withdrawing the magazine from the admissions office due to the use of profanity.…

The Fall 1991 issue of the Messenger prompted University officials to withdraw the magazine from the admissions office and no longer send it to alumni. A memo from Gerald Quigg, vice president of University relations, claimed that crude language used…

This article provides a description of an art show called “Intimate Images” at 1708 E. Main St. Gallery that includes art by artists Judy McLeod, Jude Schlotzhauer, and Amy Archinal. Each artist has a distinct style and focuses on issues such as,…

This article defines the "literary quality" mentioned in student handbooks given to freshman (called "Rats" by the author). Gibson claims that literary realism is sometimes "vulgar" and "obscene" just to be shocking, which makes it "pornographic…

This essay by then-editor-in-chief Louise Dinwiddie, analyzes the 1929 poem "The Chinese Nightingale" by white American writer Vachel Lindsay. The poem mentions many facets of Chinese culture and, as Dinwiddie recognizes, asserts that culture is…

These five poems are titled "Adaptations From the Chinese." It's unclear if these poems have any significant meanings behind them, but the tone of each of these poems appears to be negative. In "The Flowerless Garden" there is only a shadow and no…

The poem "John Brown's Body" was written by Stephen Vincent Benet in 1928 and is described in a book review by a Richmond College student. John Brown was an abolitionist who eventually was hanged for his assistance in freeing slaves and especially…

The narrator of this poem expresses his identity as part of a "colossal being" of black people, preferring the collective 'we' to the singular 'I.' He explores slavery as "the torture that was endured for years and still / Silently exists today"…

The author of this poem claims that she is "an Asian who wants to be white" and begins the poem with the choice, "I want to be more American." When asked what's stopping her, though, she responds, "That's not who I am." The root of her desire to be…
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