Race & Racism at the University of Richmond

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In response to an article on Richmond College's revival of the Messenger literary magazine, an editor reflects on the campus's past of "apathy, unconcern, and even ridicule of campus writers," ultimately deciding that the students have changed and…

After the Richmond College senate accepted financial responsibility for the return of the Richmond Messenger, a Collegian reporter interviewed professors and students interested in writing on their feelings for the publication. While many professors…

The writer of this piece argues that the Messenger does not "publish representative literary expression from the two colleges" and "has failed to attract the average local student." They claim that faculty censorship and favoritism in submissions…

The writer of this article claims that the Messenger will soon "belong to the whole University and not exclusively to Westhampton College" due to Richmond College's upcoming financial involvement in the publication. They elaborate that Richmond…

The effort to make the Messenger a joint publication between Richmond and Westhampton Colleges, as it was only published by Westhampton at this time, failed due to difficulties reconciling the colleges' budgets. Messenger editor Sue Cook McClure…

The two characters in this story, an unnamed woman and unnamed man, argue over the man's desire to move to Africa. The man claims that everyone who visits the continent "wish[es] they had come before the white man, or before colonization" and…

In this short story, an American soldier named Taylor is shot and killed after enduring torture in an unspecified Asian POW camp. Taylor is reincarnated multiple times before the story of his shooting is told, in which a military commander named…

In this short story, a law student named Winston Kingstone Manners the Fourth does cocaine and finds a book that contains his life story. Moments in his past are described as, "The beaten black boy, the date-raped freshman, and the threatened…

This short story is a retelling of the myth of Perseus and Medusa, written in black American dialect by a white student. The young women in the tale are oversexualized and the narrator exhibits colorism by referring to Polydectes's "high yaller"…

This short story from the February 1941 Messenger details the passing of a black woman named Bess. Bess's dress is described as being scant and attention-grabbing, and an unnamed man urges her to marry someone who is "her own kind" and criticizes her…
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