Race & Racism at the University of Richmond

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This article explains the death of Esau Brooks. Brooks, a black man, was the equipment manager and trainer at the University of Richmond. He was killed by the oil stove in his home. He had been working at the University of Richmond since 1914, when…

This entry includes a letter from Professor James E. Wood, Professor of Religious Studies at Baylor University, to the former President of the University of Richmond, George Modlin. Wood wrote that he was intrigued by the Report of the Joint…

This document contains correspondence from Richmond College alumni in response to an Alumni Fund call for donations in 1963. One alum, George G. Iggers, who had graduated from the university twenty years prior, wrote to an alum working on the…

This document is a collection of correspondence between President George M. Modlin and Minister Milton A. Reid of the First Baptist Church in Petersburg, Virginia. Reid applied to the T.C Williams Schools of Law in 1960, despite the segregation…

In a report from 1954 evaluating the need for the University of Richmond to integrate, the committee charged to study segregation in the graduate and professional schools concluded that there was no need to racially integrate at the time of the…

In 1963, alumus Raymond E. Abbitt refused to pay alumni dues because he believed “that if the institutions of higher learning cannot be leaders in the democratic and Christian ways of life in the United States then I see very little hope for our…

The Association of American Law Schools in 1963 voted to censure the T. C. Williams School of Law for not complying with the Association’s policy by maintaining racial segregation. The report shows that Dean Muse of the law school was the one who…

In this pamphlet announcing the publication of Freeman's biography on George Washington, there is a short biography about Freeman himself. It states that "Freeman stands today as one of America's greatest living historians. It also mentions that…

This picture is of an African-American cook. He appears to be cooking some sort of meat. The picture fails to have a caption, and therefore the cook remains nameless.

This picture, entitled "janitors," is captioned with an interesting poem. The picture depicts a black janitor sweeping a set of stairs. It simultaneously depicts the plight of the working class and the privilege of the students. Through imagery such…
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