Race & Racism at the University of Richmond

Browse Items (14 total)

This is an announcement included in the University of Richmond commencement program that provides information regarding a performance of the "Merry Wives of Windsor" by the University Players. The performance took place in the Luther H. Jenkins Greek…

This Richmond Times-Dispatch article was published on April 22, 1968. The article states that the performance would be performed May 11 and 12 at 3:30 P.M. in the Luther H. Jenkins Greek Theatre at the University of Richmond. The article also states…

This is a program from the University Player’s production of “Oedipus the King”, written by Sophocles and translated by David Grene. The cast incorporated actors, a chorus, dancers, and members of the University Brass ensemble. The play was…

This 1991 Collegian article discusses the viewpoint of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, who is a professor of history and the director of women's studies at Emory University. She spoke at the University of Richmond, advocating her view that "Southern women…

This short story, appearing in the 1897 edition of the University of Richmond’s yearbook The Spider, details the life of Dick Ricard: a Black boy with a talent for yodeling. Writing in a mocking, paternalistic tone, the author L. R. Hamberlin…

This short story is a retelling of the myth of Perseus and Medusa, written in black American dialect by a white student. The young women in the tale are oversexualized and the narrator exhibits colorism by referring to Polydectes's "high yaller"…

The article makes an announcement about a program of spiritual songs and services happening on campus. The Pop section is referred to as a "Negro Spiritual" with no credit given to the artist or the group.

The article is a book review about a piece written by John Steinback called "Grapes of Wrath". Towards the end of the article Cotten mentions a new book he read called "Native Son". He did not mention the author and referred to him as "Negro". He…

The article describes how Professor of Dramatics Alton Williams how a minor role played by two African-American actors was important to the plot of the popular play, "Petrified Forest."

This article describes the lecture series planned by The Philologian and Mu Sigma Literary Organizations on campus. The lectures featured a talk by Tom Herndon on "Negro Superstition."
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