Race & Racism at the University of Richmond

Browse Items (371 total)

In this opinion piece, second-year student at the T.C. Williams School of Law Victor Mba-Jonas responds to an opinion piece written by Mr. Scott Shepard criticizing the name change and mere existence of the Multicultural Student Union (MSU) at the…

This University of Richmond Collegian article raises awareness for the work of the Minority Student Union (MSU) in sponsoring Black History Month events. These events, under the title “Unfinished Business: Fulfilling the Dream” include events…

In this Collegian opinion piece, black student Harvey Whitney relates a quote from Ralph Ellison’s The Invisible Man to his personal experience of being considered invisible by white and black students at the University of Richmond. Whitney cites…

This short story, appearing in the 1897 edition of the University of Richmond’s yearbook The Spider, details the life of Dick Ricard: a Black boy with a talent for yodeling. Writing in a mocking, paternalistic tone, the author L. R. Hamberlin…

This opinion piece criticizes riots occurring during the summers in big cities, most likely referring to uprisings which occurred in 1968 following the assasination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The writer criticizes specifically "student rebels…

The tension between Governor L. Douglas Wilder and Attorney General Mary Sue Terry is palpable as the governor claims critiques of his performance in office are made due to his race and not his competency. He is adamant that he is “held to a…

As University of Richmond students watched the televised Black Action Movement at the University of Massachusetts, discussions and debates followed regarding instances of racism happening on campus. Sociology professors Henry Stewart and Willie Dell,…

In response to a racially charged protest of the production of “The Meeting,” Theatre and Dance Department Chair Walter Schoen claims that the Modlin Center for the arts is a “safe haven” for students to express themselves artistically and…

In this short story, a law student named Winston Kingstone Manners the Fourth does cocaine and finds a book that contains his life story. Moments in his past are described as, "The beaten black boy, the date-raped freshman, and the threatened…

This short story is a retelling of the myth of Perseus and Medusa, written in black American dialect by a white student. The young women in the tale are oversexualized and the narrator exhibits colorism by referring to Polydectes's "high yaller"…
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