Five Adaptations From the Chinese [Poems]

Dublin Core

Title

Five Adaptations From the Chinese [Poems]
The Messenger, 1929-1930
Page 4

Subject

Description

These five poems are titled "Adaptations From the Chinese." It's unclear if these poems have any significant meanings behind them, but the tone of each of these poems appears to be negative. In "The Flowerless Garden" there is only a shadow and no flowers to gaze upon in a torn garden. In "An Elegy for a High Lady," the author explains that flowers will not be placed on a grave site. In "The Bed Curtains" and "Alba: The Lute," each refers to being cold and walking around the wet dew outside. Bruce Morrissette, who is credited with these adaptations, was asked in this issue if he was a student of the Chinese language and he responded negatively, and "hinted dubiously at the assistance of a laundry man in reducing the original Chinese into crude English."

Source

Virginia Baptist Historical Society
Richmond, Va

Date

1929-30

Contributor

Matt Mullen

Format

Type

Files

11661207-5-Adaptations.jpg

Collection

Citation

Bruce Morrissette, “Five Adaptations From the Chinese [Poems],” University of Richmond Race & Racism Project, accessed June 15, 2024, https://memory.richmond.edu/items/show/101.